The Theory & Practice of Archery (2nd Edition)

The Theory & Practice of Archery (2nd Edition)
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Horace A. Ford (1822-1880) is known as the greatest target archer of all time. He first picked up the bow in 1845, and a mere four years later he won the Grand National Archery Meeting held in the United Kingdom. He proceeded to win an amazing, and unmatched, eleven consecutive championships, and a twelfth "comeback" win. His high score - that of 1271 in the Double York Round in 1857 - remained archery's high mark for over 70 years.

His masterwork, Archery: Its Theory and Practice (2nd Edition), is one of the all-time classics of archery.

Contents Covered:

  • Chapter 1 -- Introductory
  • Chapter 2 -- A Glance at the Career of the English Long Bow
    • The Anglo-Norman Period
    • Robin Hood
    • Military Achievements of the Bow in the Middle Ages
    • Its Decline and Fall
    • Revival for Amusement
    • First Toxophilite Societies
    • Grand National Archery Society
  • Chapter 3 -- Of the Bow
    • Variety of its Form and Material
    • The Flodden Bow
    • The Bows in the Tower
    • The Self-Bow, and the Various Woods of Which It Is Made
    • Yew, Its Quality and Superiority
    • How to Secure Pins
    • The Proper Shape of the Bow
    • Its Correct Length
    • The Backed Bow
    • Various Woods of Which It Is Made
    • The Yew-Backed Yew
    • The Reflexed Shaped Condemned, and Why
    • A Comparison Between Self and Backed-Yew Bows
    • The Carriage Bow
  • Chapter 4 -- How to Choose a Bow, and How to Use and Preserve It When Chosen
    • Popular Errors in the Choice of a Bow
    • Most Accomplished Shots
    • Directions as to Strength of Bow to Be Chosen
    • General Principles to Guide Its Selection
    • Reasons Why Bows Are Broken
    • How to Secure Chrysals
    • General Directions for Its Preservation and Repair
    • Of Broken Limbs
    • Concerning Unstringing
    • Weight and Length of Ladies' Bows
    • Care in the Choice and Use of a Bow Recommended
  • Chapter 5 -- Of the Arrow
    • Essentials of an Arrow
    • How to Test Its Straightness and Strength
    • Best Kind of Arrow, and Best Materials for Its Manufacture
    • Apparent Antagonism Between the Theory and Practice of Archery, as Regards the Flight of the Arrow, Discussed and Explained
    • The Chested and Bobtailed Arrows Condemned, and Why
    • Various Shapes of the Arrow
    • Its Feathering
    • Its Pile
    • Its Nock
    • Its Length
    • Its Weight
    • How to Preserve the Feathers from Damp, and to Restore Them to Shape When Ruffled by Wet
    • Curious Effects in Different Feathering of Arrows
    • Change of Tackle Whilst Shooting Condemned
    • How to Keep and Preserve Arrows
    • Necessity of Good "Stopping"
  • Chapter 6 -- Of the String, the Bracer, and Shooting-Glove
    • The Best Strings
    • Directions in Their Choice
    • How to Make the Loop
    • Its Length
    • Some Directions for Its Preservation
    • The Object of the Bracer
    • Ascham's Idea of It
    • Directions for Its Make, Material, and Mode of Fixture
    • Importance of a Well-Fitting Shooting-Glove
    • Difficulty of Laying Down Defined Rules for Its Size, Shape, etc.
    • Some Directions for Its Manufacture
    • Some Specimens of Good Gloves
    • The Tab
  • Chapter 7 -- Of the Grease-Box, Tassel, Belt, etc.
    • The Grease-box
    • The Tassel
    • The Belt
    • The Scoring Apparatus
    • The Ascham
    • The Register
    • The Targets
    • The Stands
    • The Meyler Stand
    • The Quiver
  • Chapter 8 -- Of Bracing and Nocking
    • Different Modes of Bracing
    • How to Accomplish It
    • The Proper Bend of the Bow When Strung
    • How to Ascertain It
    • The Ordinary Direction for Nocking Condemned, and Why
    • The Better Mode
    • The Nocking Place
    • The Proper Degree of Tightness
    • A Word to the Young Archer as to Changing the Nocking Part
  • Chapter 9 -- Of Position
    • The Standing and Attitudes of the Archer
    • Requirements of a Good Position
    • What to Observe, and What to Avoid
    • The Position of Feet, Heels, Knees, Shoulders, Body, and Head
    • The Grasp of the Bow
    • Waring's Method Condemned, and Why
    • The Opposite Also Condemned
    • The Proper Grasp
    • The Position of the Bow
  • Chapter 10 -- Of Drawing
    • Drawing an Essential Feature of Archery
    • Examples of Bad Methods
    • Different Modes Adopted by Good Archers
    • The Best Mode
    • Necessity of Drawing an Even Length, and Inutility of Devices to Attain It
    • Unremitting Practice the Only Way
    • A Common Failing of All Archers
    • General Directions for Drawing
    • Position of Left Arm a Most Important Feature
    • Mr. Waring's Arm-Striking Theory Condemned, and Why
    • Necessity of an Unobstructed Passage of the String Demonstrated
    • Proper Position of the Left Arm
    • The Length of the Draw
    • Drawing to the Breast Condemned, and Why
    • Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 11 -- Of Aiming
    • Prevailing Ignorance on This Point
    • Absence of Scientific Instruction upon It in All Existing Works
    • Curious Expedients Resorted to Obtain an Aim
    • These "Dodges" Condemned, and Why
    • Directions for Its Full and Proper Attainment, and Its Theory Clearly Elucidated
    • The Direct and Indirect Vision
    • The Point of Aim Explained
    • An Example
    • How the Direct Vision Should Be Applied
    • Aiming at Lengths Beyond the Target Distances
    • Shutting One Eye
  • Chapter 12 -- Of Holding and Loosing
    • Ascham's Directions the Correct Ones
    • Importance of Loosing
    • Misapprehension Amongst Archers Concerning It
    • Necessity of Its Perfect Command
    • What Is and What Is Not a Good Loose
    • Its Effect upon the Flight of the Arrow
    • Directions for Its Proper Attainment
    • Position of the String upon the Fingers
    • Some Ugly Habits Condemned
  • Chapter 13 -- Of Distance Shooting
    • Its Divisions
    • Clout-Shooting
    • The Modern System Considered as a Test of Skill or Strength
    • The Edinburgh Match
    • Justice to Modern Clout-Shooting Not Forgotten
    • Roving
    • Flight-Shooting
    • Length of Probable Range Considered
    • Experiments of Mr. Muir
    • My Own
  • Chapter 14 -- Of Ancient and Modern Scoring
    • Best Shots of the Toxophilites
    • Best Scores of Mr. Brady, Mr. Crunden, Mr. Palmer, Mr. Cazalet, Mr. Shepheard
    • Result of Mr. Waring's Arm-Striking Theory
    • Mr. Anderson the "Incomparable" Archer
    • More Modern Archers
    • Shooting at the National Meetings Considered
    • Some Scores of Messrs. Ford, Garnett, Bramhall, Moore, Maitland, Flood, Marr, Heath, Watson, and Muir
    • First and Second Scores of All the National Meetings to July, 1858
    • Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 15
    • Robin Hood
    • Distance, Accuracy and Force of the Shooting of His Time
    • Did He Shoot in a Modern Hat
    • Social Character of Archery
    • Observations to a Young Archer
    • Also to an Old One
    • A Short Address to the Fair Sex
    • A Farewell
  • Chapter 16
    • On the Formation, Rules, and Regulations of Societies
Format: PDF Digital Reprint, e-Facsimile
No. of Pages: 159
Page Size: A4 (210mm × 297mm)
Download Size: 36.7 MB
Product Code THETBCXX38
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