The Needlecraft Practical Journal of Danish Hedebo Embroidery, 1st Series

The Needlecraft Practical Journal of Danish Hedebo Embroidery, 1st Series
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Product Information

Originally published in the 1900s by Needlecraft Limited, The Needlecraft Practical Journal of Danish Hedebo Embroidery (1st Series) is one of the best resources to learn the Art of Hedebo Embroidery. It contains illustrated instructions to make over 50 different stitches, as well as a number of finished designs with charming laces and edgings, including Broderie Anglaise.

This book is a must-have for all embroidery lovers!

Book Excerpt:

By the introduction of the beautiful Danish needlepoint work into this country, the publishers of "Needlecraft" bring to the notice of their readers a needlework which for artistic beauty and durability cannot be surpassed. In addition to the admiration which this needlework -- which may be termed Embroidery or Lace, according to the use it is being put to -- for its own intrinsic worth will arouse, an especial and peculiar interest in it will be felt, owing to the fact of its being the national work of Denmark, the dearly loved homeland of our gracious Queen Alexandra.

The Danes themselves call it "Hedebosyning," which literally translated means "Hedebo" Sewing. The term "Hedebo" we have adopted and registered as our trade mark, for this particular form of embroidery...

We often hear our men folks indulge in huge jokers as to the fondness ladies have for cutting out holes in pieces of work, just for the pleasure of sewing them up again, and this work once more proves the truth of the old adage "there's many a true word spoken in jest," for it really is a very excellent description of the peculiar characteristics of Hedebo work, which consists of a number of simple designs, such as circles, squares, lozenges, shields, hearts, etc., arranged to form a pleasing pattern upon the material.

Each separate shape is outlined with thread, after which the material is cut and turned in at the edges, which are then buttonholed. The holes which are thus produced being partially filled in with lace stitches.

In addition, a number of fancy stitches, such as chain, satin, and buttonhole stitches are employed in the Embroidery surrounding the cut work, which is served to relieve the increase in rich effect.

Many designs also include a small quantity of what most foreigners call "Broderie Anglaise," but which we ourselves know as the old fashioned Madeira Embroidery. And besides these designs which are worked in the material itself, charming edges and laces are also to be made entirely with needle and thread.

One of the greatest advantages of "Hedebo" work is its adaptability, and absolutely nothing better or more suitable can be found at the present time for the embellishment of the linen blouses, collars and cuffs, trimmings, etc., now so fashionable, than a design worked in "Hedebo." ... Its extreme durability and wear resisting qualities places it in the front rank for all articles needing continual washing...

It is not at all difficult of execution, and practice very soon makes perfect... Every lady who decides to take up "Hedebo" needlepoint work will find that it is really most fascinating, and that her first piece of work will not be her last, by a very long way...

Contents Covered:

  • Introduction
  • Articles Required for the Work
  • The Stitches and How to Work Them
  • The Laces and Edgings
  • The "Silkeborg" Design
  • The "Alexandra" Design
  • The "Dagmar" Design
  • The "Copenhagen" Design
  • The "Elsinore" Design
  • The "Odense" Design
  • The "Aalborg" Design
  • The "Fuen" Design
Format: PDF Digital Reprint, e-Facsimile
No. of Pages: 16
Page Size: Letter (8.5" × 11")
Download Size: 32.3 MB
Product Code THEF8R3H69